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Expert Insights

Looking for of-the-moment commentary on breaking issues? Our media tip sheets provide up-to-the-minute expertise. Either quote directly from the tip sheet or arrange a call with one of our researchers. For more information, contact Melissa Osgood, at 607-255-9451 or mmo59@cornell.edu

Tips for protecting pets, livestock from deadly blue-green algae

Blue-green algae is returning to New York waterways and poses a deadly risk to humans as well as animals. Dr. Karyn Bischoff, toxicologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, explains the dangers and advises livestock and pet owners to be vigilant in avoiding contaminated areas.

‘Scrambled like an egg’: new Migratory Bird Treaty Act interpretation reverses decades of policy

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, designed to protect birds from harm resulting from human activity, will no longer apply to oil spills or other catastrophic events that inadvertently harm wildlife, according to a new interpretation of the act from the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Dr. Steven Osofsky is the Jay Hyman Professor of Wildlife Health and Health Policy at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and directs the Wildlife Health Cornell Center of Excellence – which takes an interdisciplinary approach to the health challenges wild animals face around the world. He says the new interpretation of the act means “another federal norm is scrambled like an egg.”

Rhino death reminder of humanity’s fatal ecological footprint

The last remaining male northern white rhino has died, researchers in Kenya announced on Tuesday. The rhino, known as Sudan, was part of an ongoing effort to save the rhino subspecies, which had fallen victim to decades of poaching. While there remains a glimmer of hope to save the subspecies through in vitro fertilization techniques, Sudan’s death underscores just how destructive humans have been to wildlife and our planet's ecology, according to a Cornell University wildlife conservationist. Dr. Steven Osofsky is the Jay Hyman Professor of Wildlife Health and Health Policy at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and directs the Wildlife Health Cornell Center of Excellence – which takes an interdisciplinary approach to the health challenges wild animals face around the world. He says wild animal populations have experienced steep declines.

Tips to keep pets happy and healthy this holiday season

As we move into the holiday season Dr. Leni Kaplan, a companion animal veterinarian at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, provides preparation tips and advice to help keep your furry friends safe and healthy.


FDA “bone treat” warning: Cornell veterinarian explains how you can protect your dog

In response to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announcement yesterday warning dog owners to avoid “bone treats,” Dr. Brian Collins, head of the Community Service Practice at Cornell University’s Hospital for Animals, explains the risks and offers some healthy alternatives.

‘Boos’ and don’ts: Halloween safety for your pet

Halloween is a festive time for many, but the season of tricks and treats may spook your pets. Dr. Bruce Kornreich, Associate Director of the Cornell Feline Health Center and veterinary cardiologist, and Dr. Brian Collins, head of the Community Service Practice at Cornell University’s Hospital for Animals, offer some tips and tricks to help your pet enjoy Halloween.
 

Three tips for keeping Fido and Fluffy fit

Wednesday, Oct. 11 is National Pet Obesity Awareness Day. Dr. Leni Kaplan, a companion animal veterinarian at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, explains the dangers of pet obesity and offers three tips to help your pet shed some weight.


World Rabies Day: Rabies prevention is a matter of education, vaccination

Every nine minutes someone dies from rabies, the deadliest zoonotic disease on the planet. While most cases of rabies are found in Africa, India, and other parts of Asia, each year 30,000 to 60,000 people in the United States receive post-exposure preventive treatment.

Four Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine experts explain the impact of rabies worldwide and provide prevention tips:


West Nile virus and infectious diseases a concern in flooded areas

Residents in areas hit by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma continue their recovery efforts, where a major concern is standing water in homes, streets and populated areas.

Dr. Isaac B. Weisfuse, a medical epidemiologist at Cornell University with more than 25 years of experience in public health at the local and national levels, says it’s important for people to keep themselves healthy as they face the daunting tasks of recovery – and to prepare personal and family emergency plans for the future.

Tracing a lethal legacy: Lead poisoning in NYS bald eagles

The American bald eagle has made a successful comeback since their numbers dwindled due to human pressures in the early 1900s. However, the charismatic national bird continues to be threatened by another human-driven cause: lead.

Dr. Krysten Schuler, wildlife disease ecologist with the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC), explains how the New York State Wildlife Health Program – a partnership between AHDC and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation that examines wildlife mortalities – recently discovered that out of 300 bald eagles tested in New York state, 17 percent had lead levels high enough to cause death from lead poisoning.
 

Public help needed to fight deadly salamander disease

Imported pet salamanders carry a new disease that could threaten salamander populations in New York state with extinction. Wildlife veterinarian Elizabeth Bunting with the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, describes the new disease and asks people to report dead amphibians to New York State DEC or the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab.

By quitting Paris accord, Trump would open Pandora’s box

President Trump is expected to announce that the U.S. is withdrawing from the Paris climate accords, a global pact designed to fight climate change. Steven A. Osofsky, a professor of wildlife health and health policy at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and a pioneer of the One Health movement, says the costs to public health are extraordinary.

Adoptapalooza: Three things to know before finding your four-legged family member

Dr. Elizabeth Berlinerthe director of Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine as well as a consultant and lead veterinarian for the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association’s Field Services program, which facilitates mobile spay/neuter and preventive medicine clinics in rural areas of the U.S. to communities without access to routine veterinary care, reviews her recommendations for any family considering the adoption of a shelter pet.

Tips and tricks for dealing with ticks

As the warm weather of spring rolls across the land, ticks are becoming more active. 

Dr. Mani Lejeune, a board-certified veterinary parasitologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center, says there are at least 16 species of ticks in New York state and 26 in the eastern U.S.

Dr. Laura Goodmana senior research associate at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center, explains the testing options available to the public at Cornell’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center. People interested in tick testing can visit AHDC's website or email, ticks@cornell.edu, to receive more information.

Migrating birds may bring bird flu to North America

Dr. Colin Parrish, John M. Olin Professor of Virology at the Baker Institute for Animal Health in Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, an expert on influenza viruses and the spread of the virus in animals, says the highly pathogenic influenza strain currently infecting wild birds and domestic poultry in several European countries could be transmitted to birds in North America as migratory flyways of some European and North American wild bird species overlap in the northern reaches of Canada.

Prepare for bird flu as never before

Dr. Jarra Jagnea veterinarian with over 21-years of experience in poultry disease management and control, says the current spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N8 in Europe and the Middle East should serve as a reminder for poultry producers in the United States to prepare as never before.

Fireworks fear? Tips to protect your pets

Many people enjoy the sounds and lights of fireworks, but they can be terrifying and overwhelming for your pets. Dr. Leni Kaplan, a companion animal veterinarian at the Cornell University Hospital for animals and a lecturer on Community Practice Service at the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine, explains how to look for signs of distress and offers some tips for keeping your pets safe and happy during summer celebrations.

Protect your pooch from new flu

In 2015, an outbreak of H3N2 has sickened dogs in the Midwest. Two veterinarians with the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine who have first-hand knowledge of the virus share information about the virus, and also provide advice on protecting your dogs from H3N2 influenza virus.

Dr. Colin Parrish, professor of virology and Director of the Baker Institute for Animal Health at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, is part of a team studying the virus and trying to pinpoint the identity of the virus strain responsible. He gives some background on what H3N2 is, how it came to the U.S. and how to protect your dog.
 

Dr. Brian Collins, a companion animal veterinarian at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, has experience in handling and treating dogs infected with canine influenza viruses and offers advice on protecting your dogs from H3N2.

What every dog owner needs to know about parvovirus

Outbreaks of parvovirus among dogs in Massachusetts, Indiana, Illinois, and New Jersey have animal shelters and owners scrambling to help sick dogs and prevent further spread of the virus.

Dr. Colin Parrish, Professor of Virology at the Baker Institute for Animal Health, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, who was involved in the development of the original parvovirus vaccine and continues to study the virus, says outbreaks of parvovirus occur periodically, and gives some advice to dog owners regarding what signs to look for and what to do if your animal becomes ill.

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