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Hospitals

Comprehensive Care + 24 Hour Emergency

Emergency & Critical Care

Agricultural Animal
Cow

Meet Our Specialists

The Emergency and Critical Care Service at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals provides medical and surgical treatment to severely injured or ill animals 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. We are the only veterinary emergency service in a 200-mile radius run by board-certified veterinary emergency and critical care specialists. We work closely with local veterinarians from across the region to make sure your animal gets the best care possible before, during and after hospitalization.

We offer the most advanced medical and surgical treatments to stabilize your animal and diagnose its condition, and we collaborate with a team of expert veterinary specialists in anesthesiology, cardiology, radiology, internal medicine, surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, and dentistry to ensure your animal receives the most comprehensive care available.

Your emergency visit to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals begins when you pull up to the circular driveway in front of the Equine and Nemo Farm Animal Hospital. Please park your vehicle in the driveway. Frequently, a technician will be waiting for you at the front door. If not, pick up the yellow phone on the right side on the door to notify a technician that you have arrived.

An emergency veterinarian will check your animal immediately to make sure that it is stable. Then veterinary residents and students will move your animal into the building, weigh the animal and bring it to an examination room or stall to begin evaluation. At the same time, a technician and a student will ask you questions about the animal's medical history and current condition. Usually, our team of veterinarians and technicians begin working to stabilize your animal immediately. 

Once we make an initial diagnosis, our board-certified faculty veterinarian and resident will discuss the findings - including cost estimates and prognoses - and develop a plan for further diagnosis and treatment of your animal. 

Some patients will require emergency surgery, which typically lasts from two to six hours. If your animal requires surgery, you can wait in our surgical waiting room or provide us with a phone number where we can contact you with surgical updates. Once the surgery is completed, we will speak to you in person or call you with information about your animal's condition and prognosis.

For other patients, our emergency care specialists will stabilize the animal and then request a consultation from another specialty service.

Patients with serious conditions will be admitted to the hospital immediately. Patients with conditions that do not require hospitalization will be discharged after treatment with detailed written instructions and a summary of the exam findings.

What to Expect During Your Emergency Visit

Your emergency visit to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals begins when you pull up to the circular driveway in front of the Equine and Nemo Farm Animal Hospital. Please park your vehicle in the driveway. Frequently, a technician will be waiting for you at the front door. If not, pick up the yellow phone on the right side on the door to notify a technician that you have arrived.

An emergency veterinarian will check your animal immediately to make sure that it is stable. Then veterinary residents and students will move your animal into the building, weigh the animal and bring it to an examination room or stall to begin evaluation. At the same time, a technician and a student will ask you questions about the animal's medical history and current condition. Usually, our team of veterinarians and technicians begin working to stabilize your animal immediately. 

Once we make an initial diagnosis, our board-certified faculty veterinarian and resident will discuss the findings - including cost estimates and prognoses - and develop a plan for further diagnosis and treatment of your animal. 

Some patients will require emergency surgery, which typically lasts from two to six hours. If your animal requires surgery, you can wait in our surgical waiting room or provide us with a phone number where we can contact you with surgical updates. Once the surgery is completed, we will speak to you in person or call you with information about your animal's condition and prognosis.

For other patients, our emergency care specialists will stabilize the animal and then request a consultation from another specialty service.

Patients with serious conditions will be admitted to the hospital immediately. Patients with conditions that do not require hospitalization will be discharged after treatment with detailed written instructions and a summary of the exam findings.

Medical and Surgical Conditions

Horses

  • Colic
  • Fracture
  • Colitis
  • Wounds (including those involving joints and tendons)
  • Pleuropneumonia
  • Hemorrhage
  • Septic foals
  • Choke

Camelids

  • Colic
  • Pneumonia
  • Uterine torsion
  • Complicated pregnancy/ delivery
  • Septicemia/ Failure of Passive Transfer
  • Severe anemia
  • Trauma

Advanced Treatments and Techniques

  • Gastrointestinal surgery, including management of intestinal strangulation, displacement, impaction and other types of colic
  • Wound repair and management, including wounds involving synovial structures (i.e. joints, tendon sheaths, bursa) and tendons
  • Musculoskeletal problems including trauma, fractures, infection and laminitis
  • Fracture repair of all types including long bones, the skull and spine
  • Reproductive emergencies including dystocia, cesarean section, and fetotomy
  • Colitis, enteritis and other intestinal diseases
  • Pneumonia, pleuropneumonia and other thoracic or abdominal disease
  • Shock treatment secondary to severe disease, endotoxemia, hemorrhage and fluid loss
  • Management of foal diseases including sepsis, failure of passive transfer, wounds and colic
  • Ophthalmology emergencies such as corneal or eyelid laceration, corneal ulceration, glaucoma, uveitis, other trauma, and rupture
  • Cardiovascular problems including arrhythmias, heart murmurs, and heart failure
  • Management of toxin ingestion or exposure such as toxic plants

Related Info

The American College of Veterinary Surgeons
A specialty organization that certifies veterinary surgeons and provides a source of referrals to pet owners.

American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
A specialty organization created to enhance animal and human health by advancing veterinary internal medicine through training, education, and discovery.

American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
A specialty organization that promotes the practice of veterinary emergency and critical care medicine, fosters training programs and encourages research in this important field.

Nemo Farm Animal Hospital Map

Driving Directions to Cornell's Nemo Farm Animal Hospital

(favorable if pulling a trailer)

FROM SYRACUSE:

  • Follow RTE 81 South and take exit 12 at Homer.
  • Turn left on RTE 281 South (Merges with RTE 13 South at A&W in Cortland) .
  • Follow RTE 13 South (through Dryden). WATCH SIGNS: RTE 13 South turns right at the last light in Dryden.
  • Approximately 6 miles south of Dryden turn left at the traffic light onto RTE 366 West (just past New York State Electric and Gas) and follow 3.5 miles.
  • Turn right at the traffic light onto Caldwell Rd. and then take the first left onto Campus Rd.
  • Cornell’s Equine Nemo Farm Animal Hospital will be the first entrance on your right.

FROM BUFFALO:

  • Take local roads to I-90 (on the NYS thruway portions you must pay a toll).
  • Go east on I-90 to exit 42 RTE 14.
  • Travel south on RTE 14 for approximately 1/4th of a mile to RTE 96 South.
  • Follow RTE 96 South into the city of Ithaca.
  • Continue on RTE 96 South (a.k.a Buffalo Street) to RTE 13 North (a.k.a Meadow Street).
  • Turn left onto RTE 13 North and travel through Ithaca to RTE 366 West (Landmark Tree Forms Store is on your right).
  • Turn right onto 366 West and follow for approximately 3.5 miles.
  • Turn right at the traffic light onto Caldwell Rd. and then take the first left onto Campus Rd.
  • Cornell’s Equine Nemo Farm Animal Hospital will be the first entrance on your right.

FROM BINGHAMTON:

  • Use local roads to I-81 North.
  • Travel north on I-81 to exit 8 for RTE 79 West at Whitney Point.
  • Drive west on RTE 79 West for approximately 28 miles. (Landmarks that indicate you are approaching your next turn: Six Mile Creek Winery on your left and signs for Cornell University on your right).
  • Turn right at the flashing yellow lights onto Pine Tree Rd.
  • Go straight through the first traffic light.
  • At the next 4-way intersection (flashing red-lights) turn right onto RTE 366 East.
  • At the first traffic light turn left onto Caldwell Rd.
  • Then take the first left onto Campus Rd.
  • Cornell’s Equine Nemo Farm Animal Hospital will be the first entrance on your right.

FROM ELMIRA:

  • Follow RTE 13 North through Ithaca to RTE 366 West (Landmark: Tree Forms Store will be on your right).
  • Turn right onto RTE 366 West and follow for approximately 3.5 miles.
  • Turn right at the traffic light onto Caldwell Rd. and then take the first left onto Campus Rd.
  • Cornell’s Equine Nemo Farm Animal Hospital will be the first entrance on your right.

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