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John S. L. Parker, BVMS, PhD

John S. L. Parker, BVMS, PhD

Baker Institute for Animal Health

Department of Microbiology and Immunology

Associate Professor of Virology

Baker Institute for Animal Health


Baker Institute for Animal Health
235 Hungerford Hill Road
Ithaca, NY 14853

Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853

Office: 607.256.5626
Email: jsp7@cornell.edu

Research Interest

Work in John Parker’s laboratory is focused on how viruses take control of cellular metabolism and biosynthesis.

  • Viruses know how cells work. Can they help us understand too? Unlike bacteria, viruses cannot generate energy or synthesize new proteins. They rely on the cells they infect to do these things for them. Using mammalian reoviruses, the Parker lab is working to understand how the cellular translational machinery responsible for decoding the genetic code and turning it into protein is usurped during viral infection. They have found that mammalian reoviruses compartmentalize the translational machinery within viral “factories” in the cytoplasm. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which reoviruses achieve this compartmentalization will provide critical insights into viral pathogenesis, as well as the basic regulatory mechanisms that control cellular translation. This work is supported by a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Training and development:

Dr. Parker directs two programs at the College of Veterinary Medicine that are helping to train the next generation of veterinary scientists.

  • Comparative Medicine Training Program. This training program supports DVMs who are undertaking PhD training in comparative medicine. The program is supported by an NIH training award that provides funding for up to 3 years for six students. This program supports US-born DVMs throughout the College of Veterinary Medicine that are undertaking advanced scientific training leading to PhD Degree.
  • The Cornell Leadership Program for Veterinary Students. Dr. Parker directs the Cornell Leadership Program for Veterinary Students. This internationally recognized program provides a summer research experience for highly talented DVM students who are interested in a career as a veterinarian in research and discovery. The program has existed for more than 25 years and more than 600 students have participated from veterinary schools throughout the world. Nearly 50% of participants have entered careers in research and discovery.

Education

  • 1978-1983, BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery)
    The University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland
  • 1994-1999, PhD, Virology
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
    Dissertation title: “Studies of the capsid determinants of canine
    parvovirus host range and mechanisms of virus uptake and infectious
    entry into cells in vitro.”
  • 1999-2000, Post-Doctoral Associate; Mentor: Dr. Colin Parrish
    Baker Institute for Animal Health
    College of Veterinary Medicine
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
    I was supported by an Individual National Research Service Award F32
    AI10134 entitled: “Research training in virus entry studies” (1999-
    2002. This award was re-allocated to Harvard University when I
    transferred to Dr. Nibert’s laboratory). During these studies I identified
    the canine and feline transferrin receptors as being the receptors for
    canine and feline parvoviruses respectively. I also showed that viral
    host range was in part determined by receptor differences.
  • 200-2002, Post-Doctoral Associate; Mentor: Dr. Max Nibert
    Harvard Medical School
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
    Harvard University, Boston, MA
    At the beginning of these studies I was supported by a National
    Research Service Award (see above). In 2002, I was awarded a
    Mentored Clinical Scientist Award K08 AI052209 entitled: “Viral
    inclusion bodies and aggresomes.”

Biography/Professional Experience

March 2009 -

Associate Professor of Virology
Baker Institute for Animal Health
College of Veterinary Medicine
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

2003 - 2009

Assistant Professor of Virology
Baker Institute for Animal Health
College of Veterinary Medicine
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

2002-2003

Instructor
Harvard Medical School
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Selected Publications

Links and abstracts for all of Dr. Parker's publications can be found at NCBI.

  1. Fraser, DR.; Parker, JS; McGregor, DD. (2016). Vocational choices made by alumni of the Leadership Program for Veterinary Students at Cornell University. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 249(7), 759-764.
  2. Desmet, EA; Anguish, LJ; Parker, JS. (2014). Virus-Mediated Compartmentalization of the Host Translational Machinery. mBio, 5(5).
  3. Dermody, T.S., Parker, J.S.L., (2013). Orthoreoviruses. In Racaniello, Knipe, and Howley (Eds.), Fields Virology(6th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
  4. Kaufer, S; Coffey, CM; Parker, JS. (2012). The cellular chaperone hsc70 is specifically recruited to reovirus viral factories independently of its chaperone function. Journal of Virology, 86(2), 1079-89.
  5. Kim, JW; Lyi, SM; Parrish, CR; Parker, JS. (2011). A proapoptotic peptide derived from reovirus outer capsid protein {micro}1 has membrane-destabilizing activity. Journal of Virology, 85(4), 1507-16.
  6. Wisniewski, ML; Werner, BG; Hom, LG; Anguish, LJ; Coffey, CM; Parker, JS. (2010). Reovirus Infection or Ectopic Expression of Outer Capsid Protein μ1 Induces Apoptosis Independently of the Cellular Proapoptotic Proteins Bax and Bak. Journal of Virology, 85(1), 296-304.
  7. Ossiboff, RJ; Zhou, Y; Lightfoot, PJ; Prasad, BV; Parker, JS. (2010). Conformational changes in the capsid of a calicivirus upon interaction with its functional receptor. Journal of Virology, 84(11), 5550-64.

Awards and Honors

  • 2005-2010, Burroughs Welcome Fund Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease
  • 2007, Pfizer Animal Health Award for Research Excellence.

Professional/Academic Affiliations

  • American Society of Microbiology
  • American Society for Virology

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